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Gelatin has no MSG.

Gelatin is hot water soluble protein extracted from collagen.  Individual collagen monomeric proteins have molecular weights of between 95,000 and 125,000 Daltons.  These proteins assemble into fibers which are massive aggregates and do not have a defined molecular weights.  To make gelatin, collagen rich materials (mostly bovine hide or porcine skins) are cleaned and treated with dilute alkaline, or acid and heat to denature (untangle) the collagen into hot water-soluble proteins.  The extract is purified and dried to form the gelatin powder.  Essentially, gelatin is thermally denatured (melted) form of collagen that makes the proteins soluble in hot water.  Collagen and by inference the gelatin proteins contains approximately 11% glutamic acid as part of the protein chains (not free glutamate).  As a matter of fact, gelatin is rather low in glutamic acid content compared with other common food proteins. 

Glutamic acid as part of protein chains is not considered a problem for MSG sensitive individuals.

 

Figure 1. Free Glutamic Acid (as MSG) and bound in Gelatin.
Taurine
0.00%
Isoleucine*
0.01%
Hydroxyproline
0.00%
Leucine*
0.02%
Aspartic Acid
0.00%
Tyrosine
0.02%
Threonine*
0.00%
Phenylalanine*
0.01%
Serine
0.01%
Hydroxylysine
0.00%
Glutamic Acid   0.01%
Omithine
  0.00%
Glycine   0.03%
Lysine*
  0.00%
Alanine   0.02%
Hystidine
  0.00%
Valine*   0.01%
Arginine*
  0.00%
Methionine*   0.00%      
* essential amino acid

Great Lakes Gelatin also sells a collagen hydrolysate.  This material consists of enzymatically treated collagen with an average molecular weight of < 5,000 Daltons (MW of Glutamic acid is 147.13 Daltons).

We have had several inquiries asking if Great Lakes Gelatin products not contain free glutamic acid.  Great Lakes Gelatin sent both gelatin and the enzymatically hydrolyzed product to an independent laboratory.  Northland Laboratories measured total free amino acid and free glutamic acid as % weight of solids (Analytic Test report, July 30, 2009) as summarized in Table 2.

Great Lakes Gelatin also sells a collagen hydrolysate.  This material consists of shortened chains of collagen with an average molecular weight of 2000 to 5,000 Daltons (MW of Glutamic acid is 147.13 Daltons).
We have had several inquiries asking if Great Lakes Gelatin products not contain free glutamic acid.  Great Lakes Gelatin sent both gelatin and the enzymatically hydrolyzed product to an independent laboratory.  Northland Laboratories measured total free amino acid and free glutamic acid as % weight of solids (Analytic Test report, July 30, 2009) as summarized in Table 2.

Table 2. Free Glutamic Acid (as MSG) and bound in Hydrolysate.
Taurine
0.02%
Isoleucine*
0.00%
Hydroxyproline
0.02%
Leucine*
0.07%
Aspartic Acid
0.00%
Tyrosine
0.00%
Threonine*
0.06%
Phenylalanine*
0.00%
Serine
0.00%
Hydroxylysine
0.09%
Glutamic Acid   0.09%
Omithine
  0.00%
Glycine   0.05%
Lysine*
  0.00%
Alanine   0.01%
Hystidine
  0.00%
Valine*   0.00%
Arginine*
  0.00%
Methionine*   0.00%      
* essential amino acid

Please note the glutamic acid in gelatin at 11% are bound in the protien chain. It is only the free (not bound) amino acid that is a cause for concern. Free glutamic acid results with gelatin is at 0.01% and collagen hydrolysate is at 0.09%. We typically find more free glutamic acid in human blood than in our gelatins.

Should you have any further questions please contact us.

 

 
Copyright 2010 Great Lakes Gelatin Company